A Free Global Handbook for Childhood: How to Measure Socio-economic Indicators and Child-targeted Public Spending in Developing Countries

Massive Discount on Premium (Standard) Membership. Access Grants, Proposals & Resources.Learn more
 

The Global Handbook for Children aims to reinforce the struggle for the rights of the child, the main idea being to provide the methodological tools needed to build and interpret indicators of child health, education and nutrition.

Searching for Project Ideas?
Join Premium and View Hundreds of Sample Proposals from Successful NGOs around the world. Learn more.
 

The first three chapters of the handbook act as a guide for those undertaking socio-economic research on the situation facing children in poor countries, and the fourth chapter turns to measuring the social spending on children in developing countries.

However, a handbook that strives to strengthen analytical capacities with a view to influencing the state should not just limit itself to the calculation of socio-economic indicators. The next step is to evaluate whether or not a government is fulfilling its commitment to respect the rights of the child in terms of access to education, health and nutrition.

Search Grants Easily
Premium Members can search for grants and donors. We have a filtered search feature to identify exact opportunities you need. Learn more.
 

To that end, the fourth chapter turns to measuring the social spending on children in developing countries. The aim is to show by means of examples how to construct and interpret indicators of budget execution. Monitoring social spending statistics can thus generate arguments for government to invest more in books than armaments; more in vaccination than bullets.

You can download this handbook for free here.

Receive Funding Alerts by Country or Your Areas of Work
As a Premium Member, you can select to receive the right funding alerts according to your country or areas of work. Join Premium
 
7 Latest and Highly Acclaimed Grants to Create Positive Impact in Developing Countries-min